Books

 

Selection

Selection

130 BW Photographs
Hard Cover
Text:English and Croatian
Limited Edition of 250 copies
Price: 50 euro for Europe / 60 euro for Overseas
Publisher: Kadar36

 

 

 

Odessa

Odessa

80 BW Photographs
Hard Cover
Text:English and Croatian
Limited Edition of 250 copies
Price: 40 euro for Europe / 50 euro for Overseas
Publisher: Kadar36

 

 

 

Miris žene

Miris žene

88 black and white photos
Hard Cover
Limited Edition of 250 copies
Price: 40 euro for Europe / 50 euro for Overseas
Publisher: Kadar36

 

 

 

Istanbul

Istanbul

90 black and white photographs
Hard bounded
English and Croatian
Duoton
Price: 35 euro for Europe / 45 euro for Overseas
Published by Kadar36

 

 

 

Stanko Abadzic - Portfolio

Portfolio

Hard bounded
Pages: 228
180 black and white photographs
Duoton
Languages: English and Croatian

Price: 35 EUR for Europe / 45 EUR for Overseas

 

 

 

Prague

Paris

Hard cover
Pages: 108
Duplex
Languages: English, Croatian and Czech

Price: 30 EUR for Europe / 40 EUR for Overseas

 

 

 

Adriatic Routes

Paris

Hard cover
Pages: 108
B/W photographs
Languages: English and Croatian by Natasa Lah
Price: 30 EUR, shipping for Europe included

 

 

 

Paris - Sketches for a portrait of the city

Paris

Hard cover
Pages: 138
Duotone
Languages: english,french,croatian
Price: 40 EUR, including shipping

Zagreb - Skice za portret grada / Zagreb - Sketches for portrait of the city

Zagreb - Sketches for portrait of the  city

Hard binding
Canvas and cover
Duotone
Pages: 150
Languages: individual croatian, english, german, french
Price: 40 EUR, including shipping

Book of nudes and poetry (Drago Glamuzina) "Sami u toj šumi“

Book of nudes and poetry

Canvas binding
Original photography on front cover
Price: 40 EUR, including shipping

Text:  Croatian by Zoran Ferić
Pages: 252 black and white photographs
ISBN: 978 953266006 2
Price: 40 EUR, including shipping

The classical compositions are in many ways reminiscent on famous photographs taken by the old master photographers - they are timeless and tell subtle, poetic stories that are often associated with a loving glance. The artist masterfully combines light and shadow as well as forms and movement with a precise eye, and he therefore creates expressive and at the same time peaceful images that remind the viewer of times long passed and consciously opposed to modern, fast-moving times and short-term effect.

Do places still exist nowadays that look as if the world has come to standstill? Many of his photographs are of Prague. The city has special meaning to Stanko Abadzic as he began to discover Prague's serene, enigmatic beauty in its medieval lanes ands walls and in return the beautiful city permanently inspired his own artistic form of expression.In addition to Prague, the artist has managed to capture quiet, lonely and sometimes surreal moments in old European cities like Budapest, Vienna, Zagreb and Krakow. Moments in which the artist seems to hug the world little tighter.

Stanko Abadzic's photography reminds me of a fusion of Henri Cartier-Bresson and the mystery of Andre Ketesz's early Hungarian images. Abadzic's images have that eastern European sensibility that manages to imply that there is a sense of magic and awe in ordinary events, while at the same time capturing the instant in time that makes great photography so fascinating.
Alex Novak, VIntage Works Ltd.

Stanko Abadzic belongs to those photographers who have retained for themselves the eye for the small thing of life. He might be compared to the French grand masters
of photography. Stanko Abadzic uses his camera to track down the idylls of every day life and the pleasures and happy nesses of the average person - just like Willy Ron is or Robert Doisneau. The language his pictures speak is clear and structured, yet his perfectly produced black and white show no trace of sobriety but radiate nostalgia and a wonderful longing for the past.
Katrin Bassen, Fotoforum

I discovered several photographs by Stanko Abadzic and was exhilarated. Why was I not familiar with the name of this classical, "old" photographer? What joy, to look at these pictures that show a logical composition and clearly tell the wanted stories. Young photographers could learn from him. Then I discover that Stanko is by no means old at the age of fifty four. He composes his pictures. is unwavering in the quality of their production, and plays with rich contrasts of light and shadow. He uses the qualities of the grand masters and presents the knowledge within various subjects, from the pure language of plans and forms all the way to the both spontaneous and staged images.A friend Robert Hausser, says: "This just goes to show, that in spite of the sorry current of pictures today, some photographers still manage to make fabulous photographs, when they do not forget their great role-models, but truly know them." One can profit from such knowledge of the language of photographs only if one incorporates it in one's own new pictures. Florian Adler, Schwarzweiss Magazine.

B/W photographs

B/W photographs

126 pages
Text: Croatian and English written by Zdravko Zima
Price: 30 EUR including shipping

STANKO ABADŽIĆ: VISUAL WANDERINGS

The question If photographer Is artist or artisan repeats itself almost simultaneously with the discovery of each innovative technique and it dates to the beginnings of photography. The decades of battle between painting and photography came as a natural consequence of a process which has peaked by their mutual coming closer. As the two autonomous disciplines, painting and photography had overlapped so much they eventually had to pay the price for their generative mechanical possibilities.

Integrity again led to polarity and latter emerged from the awareness that the perspective of an artwork's mechanical multiplicity has lost some of its former aura. What did it gain? Photography doubtlessly had had an enormous influence on revolutionizing the traditional sensibility and transforming the former understandings of art. It had transformed it in several ways: it had mediated the artifacts of the classical heritage by its novel framing and the use of light; it had done it by creating different canons from its specific possibilities and by standing as, In Its lucky moments, on its own feet.

The paradox of photographic creativity reflects in medium's permanent self-questioning. This gets particularly emphasized In an era of nearly total digitalizing by which the process of democratization has been brought to the point of oversaturation. In other words, to the point in which anyone can be an artist, which practically means that art in its original sense has become nearly voided. However, not every Renaissance painter was Leonardo; not every photographer of the third millennium is Henri Cartier-Bresson. Among the exceptions stands Stanko Abadžić, the Croatian master of photography, originally from Vukovar, whose opus can perhaps best be defined by a single noun: voyage.

Ultimately, human life is nothing else, irrespective if voyage is initiated by the search for truth, for peace or who knows what other goal. ln the psychoanalytical iconography, voyage is also synonymous with a spiritual change and the desire for new experiences initiated by creative discontent. In the case of Abadžić, the desire was additionally provoked by war troubles. He had spent some ten years in Germany and Czech Republic,feeding on nostalgia, and developing his creative talent whose need for the infinite, measured by the power of the intimate, there reached its highest point.

What is the secret of Stanko Abadžić? Primarily his ability to take a picture of the given object by his specifically attuned sensors, but also a fixation that will reveal something else. Something that is there but is not visible to the bare eye. Stanko Abadžić immerses in a landscape, he plays with light and darkness, he takes shots of chairs. Abandoned  coffeehouses, bikes, fragile ugly figures and what not; he approaches all of it by simultaneously getting awayfrom it. This double stance understood as the dialectic of the infinite and a need to, by the use of a landscape filled with emptiness, replace the void of human existence is the greatest credit to the mastery which lifts his photography above mere reproduction, above the repetitive. In the world that feeds on cheap narcissism, strengthened by conviction that while cloning it has reached the level of God, Stanko Abadžić seems like a pious loner whose camera establishes a novel miracle play, a miracle of the post-industrial world in which main roles are taken over by washed-up Barbie dolls, by women's heels, circus tents, masks and occasionally a human being that, in his existential superfluity, identifies with the shadow.

By simple word play, we could conclude that Stanko Abadžić shoots external things, but that his procedure is internal, that he directs his gaze to the initial values, that he identifies picture with silence, with breath which is spirit and which is desert (as decoration for an inner intensity). Not by chance, this master does not pursue the loud world of fads and cheap attractions. He goes behind the stage, choosing scenes that occur after the show, when one does not communicate with the other but with oneself. What he undertakes might be defined as an implosion of ecstasy, a play of warmth and coolness on the thin borderline between the light and the shadow, where light is being sensed and where shadow becomes a sign of irreality, even of the inevitable nearness of death. The artist deserts the landscape of the average world in order to get closer to the landscape of the desired infinity in which trailers, circus figures, empty glasses and hats serve as some type of symbols. Nowhere like in these minutiae, these seemingly random objects of photographic curiosity, we get condensed what could be only defined as the exponential aesthetics of wandering. This characteristic attention to the minutiae, once peculiarly fictionalized by writer and art historian Matko Peic, now gets its tribute from another man from the plain, another fellow Pannonian. Stanko Abadžić.

Albeit a witness to the new era, using the advantages of its highly sophisticated techniques, Stanko Abadžić still sees the world as desert. Desert marked by futility, a place of banishment, and yet spiritual growth becomes possible only in the desert and from the desert. Whoever can penetrate the sense of the desert's totality, will also discover the dimensions of its hard-to-map vast areas. Shooting pars pro toto the details of these areas while aiming at totality are the works offered us by the author. As Bachelard once wrote: "In the kingdom of an absolute imagination, we come of age belatedly. Earthly paradise must be lost, in order to live in it again, to experience the reality of its imagery, the absolute sublimity that overcomes each passion.“

Stanko Abadžić uses the chiaroscuro arresting the light as if it were an epiphany's intimation and offering beauty of the classical black and white photography above the gaudily colored post-cards whose authors are, at the most, condemned to mass success. The laws of photographic medium are the only criterion of its worth. Stanko Abadžić follows them fully. The power of his visualization has a double result: besides the supposed reality, his photography also gives an individual, an artist's reality.

Originally, image precedes word. We are primarily determined visually, literary only after the fact. Because of its power and its suggestibility, reflected in the development of film and other visual media, photography can also serve as the means of manipulation. Stanko Abadžić does nothing of the sort. However it is true that by photographing certain objects he seizes them within the limits of author's discrimination and ability to bring them down to the full measure of his own heart and mind.

Visits to various places such as Zagreb, Baska, Krk, Vrbnik, Opatija, Prague, Vienna, Budapest. Paris, Venice, Berlin and Tokyo, spell out a regional and global itinerary and also release photographic passion the solemnity of which would be worthy of a savior of relics. Abandoned spaces and objects left behind reveal themselves as the modalities of human forsakenness. The forsakenness materialized not only by technical mediation, but also by what Susan Sontag perspicuously declared to be the melancholy hidden under the surface of things.

After world war two, in Germany developed the literatureof ruin (Trümmerliteratur). After everything that had happened to his nation and him personally, Stanko Abadžić chooses the aesthetic of ruins by which he (re)interprets the world while patching it whole again. Thanks to his ability to inject the patina of lost time in everything he shoots, he converts past into present. With this he identifies himself as a chronicler who, aided by his own compositions, returns the purifying power of the original images.

Henri Cartier-Bresson, one of his indubitable mentors, insisted on the rule of „a defining moment“. Meaning the great importance of timing, if not of an instant in which to eternalize a scene. This almost magician-like ability to freeze the extraordinary moments, coupled with the feeling for harmony in a composition, for the balance of the black-and-white aberrations that spread out like clothes on a clothesline, gives Stanko Abadžić the quality that lifts him above the serial production: even more, he betters it by the authorship of the first order.

And as we sometimes understand the reasons for some events only later, from a proper distance, so these images bid a dream-like mise en scène in the background of which lurks an author with the biography/pictography all of his own. In the environment of an untainted imagination, Stanko Abadžić has gained the privilege to once again revive the private daydreams with the all-seeing eye. At the same time, this privilege might be a curse of a chosen one who relegates his twilight art from the circle of the predictable stereotypes.

It's so hard to be young! According to Camus, the very need to climb to the top suffices to fill a human heart. Thus despite his fate he presented Sisyphus as a happy hero. If the truth of his ceaseless efforts might prove it, than odds are that Stanko Abadžić has also reached such a stage.

Translated into English from Croatian By Boris Gregorlc